Iceland’s incredible 246ft-long geothermal ocean-side ‘infinity edge’ wellness lagoon is now open


Thought Iceland couldn’t get any more Instagrammable? Think again.

A stunning new geothermal lagoon has opened on the outskirts of Reykjavik with a 246ft- (75m) long ‘infinity edge’ and views of the North Atlantic Ocean and, at the time of writing, the erupting volcano on the Reykjanes peninsula. 

In renderings released last June, Sky Lagoon looked extremely eye-catching. And it’s just as enticing in real life, with newly released photographs showing the lagoon’s steaming blue waters framed by rugged rocks, waterfalls and a sauna fitted with what’s claimed to be Iceland’s largest window, which showcases the jaw-dropping scenery in style. 

A stunning new geothermal lagoon has opened on the outskirts of Reykjavik with a 246ft- (75m) long 'infinity edge'

A stunning new geothermal lagoon has opened on the outskirts of Reykjavik with a 246ft- (75m) long ‘infinity edge’ 

Newly-released images show photogenic Sky Lagoon's steaming blue waters framed by rugged rocks and waterfalls

Newly-released images show photogenic Sky Lagoon's steaming blue waters framed by rugged rocks and waterfalls

Newly-released images show photogenic Sky Lagoon’s steaming blue waters framed by rugged rocks and waterfalls

Guests are encouraged to follow a 'seven-step ritual' while at the lagoon, inspired by Icelandic tradition. The first step involves experiencing the 'healing warm geothermal waters' of the lagoon

Guests are encouraged to follow a 'seven-step ritual' while at the lagoon, inspired by Icelandic tradition. The first step involves experiencing the 'healing warm geothermal waters' of the lagoon

Guests are encouraged to follow a ‘seven-step ritual’ while at the lagoon, inspired by Icelandic tradition. The first step involves experiencing the ‘healing warm geothermal waters’ of the lagoon

Other features of the steaming pool – which remains a constant 38 to 40C – include a swim-up bar serving local beers and cocktails, a dining spot with tasting menus and traditional morsels on offer and spa rooms housed inside a turf house inspired by age-old Icelandic buildings.

Guests are encouraged to follow a ‘seven-step ritual’ while at the lagoon, inspired by Icelandic tradition. 

The first step involves experiencing the ‘healing warm geothermal waters’ of the lagoon, this is then followed by a plunge in a glacier-fresh pool to ‘stimulate the immune system’, with a five to ten-minute stint in the sauna to ‘cleanse the skin’ and warm up afterwards. 

Moving to step four, the Sky Lagoon has a unique ‘cold fog-mist space’ that apparently is ‘stimulating and rejuvenating for mind, body and soul’. 

For step five, guests are invited to apply the lagoon’s signature Sky Body Scrub, which promises to ‘improve how you feel, inside and out’.

Sessions in the steam room and a shower complete the circuit.   

A peek inside the sauna at the Sky Lagoon, which features what's claimed is Iceland's largest window

A peek inside the sauna at the Sky Lagoon, which features what's claimed is Iceland's largest window

A peek inside the sauna at the Sky Lagoon, which features what’s claimed is Iceland’s largest window

The steaming pool - which remains a constant 38 to 40C - includes a swim-up bar serving up local beers and cocktails

The steaming pool - which remains a constant 38 to 40C - includes a swim-up bar serving up local beers and cocktails

The steaming pool – which remains a constant 38 to 40C – includes a swim-up bar serving up local beers and cocktails

The Sky Lagoon was masterminded by attractions and hospitality firm Pursuit. Commenting on its opening David Barry, Pursuit's president, said: 'The restorative nature of wellness experiences such as Sky Lagoon will become much more meaningful as we continue to emerge from what has been an incredibly challenging period'

The Sky Lagoon was masterminded by attractions and hospitality firm Pursuit. Commenting on its opening David Barry, Pursuit's president, said: 'The restorative nature of wellness experiences such as Sky Lagoon will become much more meaningful as we continue to emerge from what has been an incredibly challenging period'

The Sky Lagoon was masterminded by attractions and hospitality firm Pursuit. Commenting on its opening David Barry, Pursuit’s president, said: ‘The restorative nature of wellness experiences such as Sky Lagoon will become much more meaningful as we continue to emerge from what has been an incredibly challenging period’

Visitors have a choice of two packages at Sky Lagoon, with the more expensive Sky Pass providing access to a private changing and shower area, with premium hair and skincare amenities to experiment with.  

The Sky Lagoon was masterminded by attractions and hospitality firm Pursuit. 

Commenting on its opening David Barry, Pursuit’s president, said: ‘The restorative nature of wellness experiences such as Sky Lagoon will become much more meaningful as we continue to emerge from what has been an incredibly challenging period.

‘The need to reenergize, relax and restore is integral to both our physical and mental well-being and we are thrilled to introduce guests to the Sky Lagoon experience.’ 

The Sky Lagoon is located at Karsnes Harbour, Kopavogur, just a few minutes' drive from Reykjavík's city centre. Tickets start from £48 (8,500 Icelandic Krona) with various entry slots available seven days a week

The Sky Lagoon is located at Karsnes Harbour, Kopavogur, just a few minutes' drive from Reykjavík's city centre. Tickets start from £48 (8,500 Icelandic Krona) with various entry slots available seven days a week

The Sky Lagoon is located at Karsnes Harbour, Kopavogur, just a few minutes’ drive from Reykjavík’s city centre. Tickets start from £48 (8,500 Icelandic Krona) with various entry slots available seven days a week

Iceland is one of the 'green list' countries recently announced by the UK Government, meaning that Britons can fly there without the need to quarantine or isolate upon their return from May 17

Iceland is one of the 'green list' countries recently announced by the UK Government, meaning that Britons can fly there without the need to quarantine or isolate upon their return from May 17

Iceland is one of the ‘green list’ countries recently announced by the UK Government, meaning that Britons can fly there without the need to quarantine or isolate upon their return from May 17 

Meanwhile, Sky Lagoon’s general manager, Dagny Petursdottir, added: ‘The traditions of bathing culture are integral to the Icelandic way of life and are at the core of the Sky Lagoon experience.

‘This rejuvenating and transformative experience will enable guests to connect with mind, body and spirit through the radiant powers of geothermal waters.’   

The Sky Lagoon is located at Karsnes Harbour, Kopavogur, just a few minutes’ drive from Reykjavík’s city centre. 

Tickets start from £48 (8,500 Icelandic Krona) with various entry slots available seven days a week. 

Iceland is one of the ‘green list’ countries recently announced by the UK Government, meaning that Britons can fly there without the need to quarantine or isolate upon their return from May 17.

For more information visit skylagoon.com.



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Written by bourbiza

bourbiza is an entertainment reporter for iltuoiphone News and is based in Los Angeles.

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